c.Common Meds

This page lists medications that may be prescribed for your rabbit.  If your med is not listed here, that does not necessarily mean that it will harm your bunny.  If you’re worried, though, discuss it with your vet and/or another rabbit specialist.

 Here is a downloadable version:  medicine chart

Notes:

  1. Unless specified otherwise, all meds are oral.
  2. For injectables, be sure to use a brand-new sterile needle and syringe each time.  Used needles must be disposed of through a needle disposal site.
  3.  Never give steroids at the same time as you give NSAIDS (non-steroidals).

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Medical Abbreviation Cheat Sheet

PO  by mouth (orally)

SID  once a day

BID  twice a day

TID  three times a day

OS  left eye

OD  right eye

OU  both eyes

AS  left ear

AD  right ear

AU  both ears

Sub-Q  sub-cutaneous (beneath the skin)

Words to Know

ophthalmic:  relating to the eye

otic:  relating to the ear

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Medicines

  • Albendazole (Valbazen)  Anti parasitic, used for Encephalitozoo cuniculi (E-cuniculi)
  • Albon (Sulfadimethoxine)  Albon is a sulfa antibiotic usually used to kill internal parasites called coccidia.  Albon should not be used on rabbits who have kidney or liver disease, or on pregnant does.
  • Azithromycin  Antibiotic, not to be used in conjunction with Propulsid.
  • Baytril (Enrofloxacin)  Injectable or oral antibiotic.  Comes in several strengths, so pay attention to dosage. Baytril has a bitter flavor, so you might try mixing it with something tart, like cranberry or prune baby food if you want to try getting your bunny to eat the medicine, rather than syringe feeding it.
  • BNP (Bacitracin-Neomycin-Polymyxin)/Triple antibiotic eye ointmentTopical eye ointment or drops
  • Benazthine/Procaine Penicillin (Bicillin, Dual-pen, BP Pen G):  INJECTABLE antibiotic.  NEVER give orally.  Refrigerate and shake well before use
  • Carprofen (Rimadyl)  Pain reliever and anti-inflammatory.  Tastes bitter, so you can mix the crushed tablets with something tart, such as cranberry or prune.  If switching from Metacam, wait one week before starting the Carprofen.  May be used in conjuction with the narcotic Tramadol.
  • Chloramphenicol  Antibiotic.  A few sensitive people (not rabbbits) can get a fatal anemia from this drug, so wash your hands after handling for safety
  • Cholestyramine  Intestinal toxin-binder
  • Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)  Antibiotic
  • Ciloxin   Topical eye drops
  • Cisapride(Propulsid)  For stomach and intestinal disorders.  Promotes GI motility
  •  Enrofloxacin (Baytril)  Injectable or oral antibiotic.  Comes in several strengths, so pay attention to dosage
  • Fenbendazole (Panacur)  Used for internal parasites, including E. cuniculi
  • Flagyl (Metronidazole)  Antibiotic
  • Gentocin  Topical eye drops or ear drops, not to be used interchangeably
  • Ivermectin (Ivomec)  Injectable or oral anti-parasitic used to kill mites.  It works by attacking the neurotransmitters of the parasites, causing paralysis or g.i. shutdown.
  • Lactated Ringer’s Solution (Subcutaneous fluids, LRS)  Injected fluids used to rehydrate.  Use a sterile needle after every use.  This is a prescription drug and should not be used on a rabbit with a weak heart.
  • Metacam (Meloxicam)  Injectable or oral pain med.  Bunnies usually think it’s yummy, but you can always mix it in with mushed up banana, and they should gobble it right up.  This way, no syringe feeding-torture!
  • Metroclopramide (Reglan)  GI motility drug
  • Metronidazole (Flagyl)  Antibiotic
  • Neomycin  Topical eye drops or ear drops, not to be used interchangeably
  • Panacur (Fenbendazole)  Used to kill internal parasites
  • Pen G (Procaine Penicillin G, PPG)  INJECTABLE antibiotic.  NEVER give orally.  Refrigerate and shake well before use.
  • Ponazuril  Used to kill coccidia.  For each pound of rabbit, give 10 mg orally once a day for three days.  Wait a week, then repeat for three more days.  Ponazuril should be kept refrigerated.  Shake well before dosing.
  • Propulsid (Cisapride)  For stomach and intestinal disorders.  Promotes GI motility.
  • Reglan (Metroclopramide)  Motility drug
  • Revolution (Selamectin)  Externally applied for fur mites, fleas, and ear mites.  Comes in two strengths, so be sure to get dosing directions from your vet.  In general, a rabbit should get 6 – 18 mgs for every kilogram he weighs (2.2 lbs).  So, if you’re using the stronger dog strength (120 mgs/ml), give 0.125 – 0.15 cc to a rabbit weighing less than five pounds.  For a rabbit over five pounds, use 0.25 – 0.3 cc.
  • Rimadyl (Carprofen)  Used to alleviate pain.  Tastes bitter, so mix the crushed tablets with something tart, like cranberry or prune.  If switching from Metacam, wait one week before starting Carprofen.
  • Selamectin (Revolution)  Externally applied for fur mites, fleas, and ear mites.  Comes in two strengths, so be sure to get dosing directions from your vet.
  • Septra (TMS, Trimeth-Sulfa, Sulfa-Trim Septra, Bactrim, Trimethoprim-sulfadiazine, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole)  Antibiotic that kills coccidia, among other things
  • Silvadene (SSD)  Topical antibacterial ointment
  • Sub-Q fluids (subcutaneous fluids, Lactated Ringer’s Solution, LRS)  Injected fluids used to rehydrate.  Use a sterile needle every use.  This is a prescription drug and should not be used on a rabbit with a weak heart.
  • Sulfadimethoxine (Albon)  Antibiotic used to kill coccidia
  • Terramycin (Tetracycline eye ointment)  Topical eye ointment
  • TMS (Septra,Trimethoprim-sulfadiazine, etc.)  Antibiotic that kills coccidia, among other things
  • Tramadol  Narcotic for severe pain.  Doses should be separated by at least six hours.  May be used with Carprofen if you need anti-inflammatory meds, too.
  • Tresaderm  Ear solution
  • Valbazen (Albendazole)  Antiparasitic used for E. cuniculi
  • Zithromax  Antibiotic, not to be used in conjunction with Propulsid. 

 

XXX Medicines to Avoid

If any of these medications are prescribed for your rabbit, get a second opinion from a vet who specializes in rabbits.

  • Amoxicilin  Potentially fatal antibiotic.  Should NEVER be given to a rabbit.
  • Oral Penicillin  will KILL a rabbit.  Penicillin must be injected, bypassing the GI tract.
  • Neosporin Plus  Regular Neosporin and triple antibiotic are both okay, but unless specifically told to use it, avoid Neosporin Plus because it contains Lidocaine.
  • Topicals containing Zinc
  • Frontline  NEVER use Frontline because it may kill your rabbit.  Use Revolution or Advantage in the dosage prescribed by your vet.
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